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Tumbling Jewyorican

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http://rflevin.com

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    Taken at Cherry Hill in Sheepshead Bay- is it made FOR or OF Caucasians??

    Taken at Cherry Hill in Sheepshead Bay- is it made FOR or OF Caucasians??

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #food  #brooklyn 
    Bubbling cheese fondue.

Nomnomnomnom

    Bubbling cheese fondue.

    Nomnomnomnom

    — 3 years ago with 2 notes
    #food  #fondue  #nom 
    Cherry Hill Market in Sheepshead Bay: where you can still buy racist mustard from the old country.

    Cherry Hill Market in Sheepshead Bay: where you can still buy racist mustard from the old country.

    — 3 years ago with 5 notes
    #brooklyn  #sheepshead bay  #racist  #wtf  #food  #mustard  #russian 
    Cake Chef’s Cookie Jar is the best place to get cookies on Staten Island. It’s probably one of the better places in the whole city. That’s why my Manhattan ass travels for an hour to get them (also to visit my parents but seriously these are good freakin’ cookies)

These are the cookies I gave to the nurses while I was in labor.

$10/lb for really top notch cookies. What a deal!

    Cake Chef’s Cookie Jar is the best place to get cookies on Staten Island. It’s probably one of the better places in the whole city. That’s why my Manhattan ass travels for an hour to get them (also to visit my parents but seriously these are good freakin’ cookies)

    These are the cookies I gave to the nurses while I was in labor.

    $10/lb for really top notch cookies. What a deal!

    — 3 years ago with 3 notes
    #cookie  #food  #bakery  #nom  #staten island  #gourmet  #review  #yummy 

    I’m at the Vegetarian Dim Sum house on Pell St reminiscing about when I used to come here years ago and the only people here were Chinese or Jewish (90% Chinese 10% Jewish unless it was Xmas then it was 50/50). Now Mr Levin and I are the only Jews, there’s 1 table of Chinese and the rest of the place is fucking loudmouth fucking hipsters. Seriously. Someone just asked for a fucking fork. Dimsum isn’t ironic-go back to Williamsburg asshole. The waiters speak English now.

    At least the food is still just as good as it was back then.

    Fucking Hipsters

    — 3 years ago with 1 note
    #dim sum  #food  #hipsters  #rant  #chinese  #jewish  #nyc  #kvetching 

    Kosher Turkeys and Mr. Levin’s Beard

    A non-Jewish neighbor needed a favor from Mike. This is what happened

    — 3 years ago with 3 notes
    #FTW  #Food  #Jewish  #Kosher  #WTF  #Neighbors  #Funny 
    King oyster mushroom from the farmers market. What should I do with it?

    King oyster mushroom from the farmers market. What should I do with it?

    — 4 years ago with 1 note
    #food  #recipe  #mushroom  #nom 
    Mrs. Levin’s (that’s me!) step by step (sort of) guide to making flax seed hot cereal

    Step 1: Put flax seed meal in a bowl (I grind my own but you can buy pre-ground in the store- It goes bad VERY quickly though…and un-ground stays good in the fridge for up to a year)

    Step 2: Get a spoonful of “stuff”. I used apple butter for my stuff but you can use anything you want for flavor (fruit puree, maple syrup…whatever). Add it to the flax seed bowl.

    Step 3: Heat up some kind of milk (rice milk, soy milk, moo-cow fuck milk…whatever) in the microwave. I use about twice as much milk as flax in the bowl. Use whatever quantity you want, I don’t care.

    Step 4: Gradually add the milk whilst stirring. Keep doing this until you get the desired thickness

    Step 5: NOMNOMNOM

    Step 6: I CAN HAS MOAR? WANT!

    — 4 years ago with 1 note
    #flax seed  #health  #recipe  #Mrs. Levin  #guide  #food 
    Mrs. Levin’s (that’s me) Step By Step (sort of) Guide to making Gefilte Fish

    Step 1: Catch a Fish (make sure it has BOTH fins and scales)


    Step 2: Get a guy who isn’t skeeved out by fish guts to fillet the fish for you (but keep the heads etc to make the fish stock)

    Step 3: De-bone the fish fillets

    Step 4: Place the  bones, skin, and fish heads in a large pot. Add water and salt and bring to a boil. Remove the foamy stuff. Slice 1 onion in rounds and add along with some carrots, and celery. Add sugar and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for about 20 minutes while the fish fillets  are being prepped.

    Step 5:  Put the deboned fish fillets in a blender.

    Step 6: Blend them.

    Step 7: In a Slapchop finely chop  onions,  carrots, and maybe a parsnip- add to the blended fish

    Step 8: Mix in  eggs,  some salt, pepper,  cold water, and mix . Stir in enough matzah meal to make a light, soft mixture into ovals (or cubes for all I care), about the size of…i dunno… a fracking gefilte fish.

    Step 9: Take the onions, skins, head, and bones out of the pot and return the stock to a simmer. Put the fish ovals (or trapezoids) in the simmering fish stock. Cover loosely and simmer for an episode of COPS.
    Step 10: Remove the Gefiltes from the stock with a spoon with holes in it (thine holy spoon).

    Step 11: Chill, Smother in horseradish, Feed to husband.

    — 4 years ago with 1 note
    #Cooking,  #Jewish  #Food  #Kosher  #Recipe  #Guide  #Gefilte  #Fish 
    Affogato (gelato with 2 shots of espresso poured over it) @indianroadcafe

    Affogato (gelato with 2 shots of espresso poured over it) @indianroadcafe

    — 4 years ago with 1 note
    #food  #affogato  #espresso  #gelato  #inwood 
    Espresso and Bamba- Breakfast of Champions!

    Espresso and Bamba- Breakfast of Champions!

    — 4 years ago with 1 note
    #Bamba  #breakfast  #coffee  #food  #espresso  #nomnomnom 
    Cinderella fruit: Wild delicacies become cash crops →

    New Scientist article: 10 November 2009 by Charlie Pye-Smith

    Read full article

    ""IF YOU had come here 10 years ago, says Thaddeus Salah as he shows us round his tree nursery in north-west Cameroon, you would have seen real hunger and poverty. "In those times," he says, "we didn’t have enough chop to eat." It wasn’t just food - "chop" in the local dialect - that his family lacked. They couldn’t afford school fees, healthcare or even chairs for their dilapidated grass-thatch house.

    Salah’s fortunes changed in 2000 when he and his neighbours learned how to identify the best wild fruit trees and propagate them in a nursery. “Domesticating wild fruit like bush mango has changed our lives,” he says. His family now has “plenty chop”, as he puts it. He is also earning enough from the sale of indigenous fruit trees to pay school fees for four of his children. He has been able to re-roof his house with zinc sheets and buy goods he could only dream of owning before. He even has a mobile phone.

    From Salah’s farm we gaze across the intensively cultivated hills which roll away towards the Nigerian border. “Ten years ago, you’d hardly see any safou [African plum, Dacryodes edulis] in this area,” says Zachary Tchoundjeu, a botanist at the World Agroforestry Centre's regional office in the Cameroonian capital Yaoundé. “Now you see them growing everywhere.”

    The spread of African plum through these hills is one small part of a bigger movement that could change the lives of millions of Africans. The continent is home to some 3000 species of wild fruit tree, many of which are ripe for domestication. Chocolate berries, gingerbread plums, monkey oranges, gumvines, tree grapes and a host of others could soon play a role in ensuring dependable food supplies in areas now plagued by malnutrition (see “Future fruits of the forest”).

    One of the architects of the programme is Roger Leakey, a former director of research at the World Agroforestry Centre. He calls these fruit trees “Cinderella species”: their attributes may have gone unrecognised by science and big business, but the time has come for them to step into the limelight.

    "The last great round of crop domestication took place during the green revolution [in the mid-20th century], which developed high-yielding varieties of starchy staples such as rice, maize and wheat," says Leakey. "This new round could scarcely be more different." Sparsely funded and largely ignored by agribusiness, high-tech labs and policy-makers, it is a peasant revolution taking place in the fields of Africa’s smallholders.

    The revolution has its roots in the mid-1990s, when researchers from the World Agroforestry Centre conducted a series of surveys in west Africa, southern Africa and the Sahel to establish which indigenous trees were most valued by local people. “We were startled by the results,” says Tchoundjeu. “We were expecting people to point to commercially important timber species, but what they valued most were indigenous fruit trees.”

    In response to this unexpected finding, the World Agroforestry Centre launched a fruit tree domestication programme in 1998. It began by focusing on a handful of species, including bush mango (Irvingia gabonensis), an indigenous African species unrelated to the Indian mango, African plum - not actually a plum but a savoury, avocado-like fruit sometimes called an afrocado - and a nut tree known locally as njansan (Ricinodendron heudelotii). Though common in the forests and as wild trees on farms, they were almost unknown to science. “We knew their biological names, but that was about all,” says Ebenezar Asaah, a tree specialist at the World Agroforestry Centre. “We had no idea how long it took for them to reach maturity and produce fruit, and we knew nothing about their reproductive behaviour.” Local people, in contrast, knew a good deal about them, as the trees’ fruits have long been part of their diet.

    Rural Africans consume an enormous variety of wild foodstuffs. In Cameroon, fruits and seeds from around 300 indigenous trees are eaten, according to a study by researchers at Cameroon’s University of Dschang. A similar survey in Malawi and Zambia found that up to 40 per cent of rural households rely on indigenous fruits to sustain them during the “hungry months”, particularly January and February, when supplies in their granaries are exhausted and they are waiting for their next harvest (Acta Horticulturae, vol 632, p 15).

    Some of these so called “famine foods” have already been domesticated by accident, says ethnoecologist Anthony Cunningham of People and Plants International, an NGO based in Essex Junction, Vermont. He cites the example of marula (Sclerocarya birrea), a southern African tree in the cashew family with edible nutty seeds encased in a tart, turpentine-flavoured fruit. “Long before the development of agricultural crops, hunter-gatherers were eating marula fruit,” he says. “They’d pick the best fruit, then scatter the seeds around their camps.” These would eventually germinate and mature into fruit-bearing trees, ensuring, in evolutionary terms, the survival of the tastiest. Marula is now fully domesticated and the fruit is used to make juice, a liqueur called Amarula Cream and cosmetic oils.”“

    — 4 years ago with 1 note
    #science  #africa  #fruit  #new scientist  #food 

    I died and went to Venezuela.

    Erin and I had lunch (it was 10am so more like brunch) at Capachas Y Mas on Dyckman & Nagle. FANTASTIC. The food was really fracking good and pretty fracking cheap. I had a Cachapa-corn pancake with fillings ($6), Tequeños-cheese sticks ($1 each), and a lime juice/sugar drink. Erin got Patacones (plaintain sandwich). The portions are pretty big. Both Erin and I brought half of our food home.

    The people behind the counter were very nice and explained everything on the menu to us. These guys genuinely want to share good Venezuelan street food with the ‘hood. I don’t know why there isn’t a line out the door.

    Check out the website http://cachapasymasnyc.com and the facebook fan page http://is.gd/3BxXl

    They open at 10am and close at 5am. And they deliver.

    — 5 years ago with 1 note
    #10034,  #Inwood  #Venezuela  #Cachapas  #Empanadas  #Food  #Restaurant